Polling Precincts Open Statewide; Voting Turnout Moderate - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Polling Precincts Open Statewide; Voting Turnout Moderate

Election day was off to a slow start Tuesday as rain fell across much of the state of Alabama.  However, turnout was expected by some to improve as the weather cleared.

Rather than a typical morning rush in Mobile County, Probate Judge Don Davis said the early turnout is very low. Thunderstorms dumped about three inches of rain overnight on the coast, but the weather was improving.

The chief registrar in Jefferson County, Nell Hunter, said voting was steady, but more people than normal were calling to check on their voting location.

The morning turnout was low in Montgomery, but Madison County officials said there were some lines at balloting places in the Tennessee Valley.

Chip Hill, a spokesman for lt. governor candidate Jim Folsom is optimistic.  "At this point all indications are it's going to be a pure turnout race and we believe we have done everything in our power to get our people to the polls and will continue to do so and we're very optimistic."

Most polls have showed the race between Folsom and Luther Strange quite close and whoever is best able to get out their vote may end up with the advantage when the night is over.

Polling places opened at 7 a.m. and will close at 7 p.m. in Alabama's 67 counties.

There have already been problems in some precincts around the country with electronic voting machines.  The Associated Press reports problems for voters in Indiana, Ohio, and Florida.

Estimates by some are that around 30 percent of voters will be using equipment added to voting facilities since 2004.

The Department of Justice is sending observers to Lee, Chambers, and Tuscaloosa counties in Alabama.  The U.S. Attorney's office for the Middle District of Alabama said this morning they have not received any complaints of voting irregularities.

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