Montgomery Riverfront Construction Update - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Montgomery Riverfront Construction Update

Montgomery's Riverfront Nearly Finished Montgomery's Riverfront Nearly Finished

Much like the Alabama River, it seems as though the construction of the downtown riverfront has gone on forever.

"It's taken so long partially due to the bulkhead section and the weather," said city engineer Chris Conway.

Slower than the riverfront train but today city officials have a better handle on when workers will wrap it up.

"Hopefully, by the end of this month and certainly by the time Jubilee Cityfest gets here," said Conway.

To understand just how far this project has come, they started with the amphitheatre about 3 years ago, but the most difficult part of the job had not been done yet; putting in the seawalls and then building the massive bulkhead which essentially supports the entire riverfront.

"The biggest problem was the composition of what was here before. We were digging into the unknown," said Conway.

Under water they found no real surprises, just a lot of work but that job is finished and right now workers are smoothing out the finishing touches of phase 3. Phase 3 is the walk-way, the boating dock and the pavilion.

"I think the Renaissance Hotel and the transfer facility.. this is all part of the revitalization of downtown. It'll be a place people want to be," said Conway.

From a financial point of view, the new riverfront is not something the city expects to get a return on its investments, but then again Chris Conway says that was never really the point in the first place.

"The vision was much more long term than that," Conway said.

And the long term includes phase 4 which is underway. That's where workers are laying the foundation for the observation tower and the pedestrian walkway that will eventually connect with the city's transfer facility.

"We believe it all ties in together," Conway said.

What really ties it all together is the $20 million it'll take to complete the riverfront. Most of the money has come from federal government.

Reporter: Bryan Henry

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