Bullock County Church Takes Damage From Storm - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Bullock County Church Takes Damage From Storm

For the most part,  Alabama escaped any serious damage from yesterday's line of storms, but one place that didn't - rural Bullock County.

A small church in the countryside near Jamback is without a key part of its identity tonight.  But that isn't bothering its members much.

People in Bullock County saw an ominous sky above them hours after others in Lowndes, Crenshaw, Macon and Montgomery escaped with little damage.

A dark sky that came down in Jamback.

"We were sittin' at the house when we heard them issue the warning and by that time the wind started howling at my house and then it started hailing," said Rodney Ousley.

Like so many others, people living nearby escaped any problems at all...but after a while, passers by noticed something at the community's spiritual center.

"We got a call last night about ten saying the storm had hit our church so we came up and looked," said congregation member Betty Starks.

"When we got here last night, it was dark up here, you know the power and stuff was out, you could see limbs and the front door was open," Ousley said.

Daylight revealed what the winds had done. A stand of pines twisted, the front porch and its columns, gone. The cross at the top of the steeple, toppled over.  And, where the Mount Hermon church buried its forefathers, part of a roof. This is home to about 50 people every 4th Sunday the month. Betty Starks says they are thinking practically.

"We're just waiting for the secretary and then we're going to contact our insurance," she said.

And even though the church might need a little work soon, they are thankful with what nature left behind.

"It could have taken the whole church. But I just thank God we don't have no more damage than we do," Starks said.

The Bullock County Sheriff's Department tells WSFA 12 News other than the wind strike at in Banks and Jamback, the county escaped any other serious damage from the storm.

Reporter: Chris Holmes

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