A Glimpse into the Archives: Wallace's Blood-Soaked Clothes - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

A Glimpse into the Archives: Wallace's Blood-Soaked Clothes

Wallace's navy blue tie and pants Wallace's navy blue tie and pants
Wallace's shoes Wallace's shoes
Bullet fragments ripped a  hole in Wallace's tie Bullet fragments ripped a hole in Wallace's tie
Cornelia Wallace's dress, shoes and belt are stored in the archives case. Cornelia Wallace's dress, shoes and belt are stored in the archives case.

Governor Wallace's campaign for the U.S. presidency was gaining momentum on that fateful day 35 years ago.

Bits and pieces of that day have been collected and are now stored away in the Alabama State Department of Archives and History building in downtown Montgomery.

It's something the general public doesn't get to see until now.

WSFA 12 News reporter Sally Pitts was allowed a glimpse of this historic collection.

They are a vivid reminder of the day Governor Wallace was shot and pieces of Alabama's past kept out the public eye.

Assistant curator George Jennings says they don't display the blood-stained clothes to the public out of respect for the Wallace family.

The clothing the governor wore that day are tucked away in a gray storage case marked simple as number "84".

Careful steps are taken to preserve the items. Jennings wears white gloves as he lightly touches the tie and shoes that Governor Wallace wore.

Temperature and humidy are enemies of preservation, so they are closely monitored.

Inside the case, neatly folded but still showing signs of blood and bullet holes, sits the light blue dress shirt and dark blue tie.

The yellow and white colored dress Corneilia Wallace was wearing when she threw her body on top of her husband is in the case as well.

The suit Wallace's body guard, E.C. Dothard, wore that day is also stored in the case.

Perhaps the most poignant items in the case are the dark colored shoes Governor Wallace had on that day; the last pair of shoes he would ever walk in.

Jennings said before his death Wallace actually came to see the items at the Department of Archives and History.

He died in 1998 at the age of 79.

After getting news of Bremer's release Wallace's children, George Jr. and Peggy Wallace Kennedy said in a telephone interview that their father suffered for 25 years and so did his family because he was never the same after the shooting.

They feel Bremer should have served all of his sentence.

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