Prattville Helping Storm Victims Find Reputable Contractors - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Prattville Helping Storm Victims Find Reputable Contractors

Mayor Jim Byard holds up a copy of the special blue permit. Mayor Jim Byard holds up a copy of the special blue permit.

Prattville, AL (WSFA) -- With so many Prattville residents trying to rebuild following Sunday's tornado. Finding a contractor to do the work can be difficult. And there are some people out there hoping to take storm victims for a ride.

That's why the city is asking contractors to get a special storm work permit at The Church of Living Water on Sheila Street. The church is also serving as a help center for residents.

A crew from Rescue Clean was busy Tuesday packing up what's left of Tami Ruberti's belongings. For Tami, it's the first of many hires she'll have to make in the months to come.

"All the floors are going to be redone, the roof will be redone, the back wall will be rebuilt," she explained.

Tami says she called Rescue Clean because her insurance company recommended the firm. 

But it's also a good idea to check a contractor's credentials with the city. The special work permits are blue in color and can be placed in a contractor's front windshield.

Rescue Clean workers picked up their permit Tuesday. Tami says she's been satisfied with their work.

"They basically came in and knew what to do. You know, you're basically in shock. You don't know what to do yourself," she said.

So whether it's a tree surgeon, a plumber, an electrician, or a builder, look for that blue permit before you make the hire.

If you run across a contractor who may be taking advantage of storm victims, call the attorney general's fraud hotline at 1-800-392-5658. 

The city is also sending letters to homeowners describing its debris removal policy. It requires contractors to haul away any debris they collect. For residents who do their own work, the city will provide curbside pick-up.

Mayor Jim Byard says the city is getting help from Montgomery and Elmore counties, but it still could take up to six months to get all of the debris hauled away.

Reporter: Mark Bullock

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