Michigan auto industry company plans Alabama plant - WSFA.com Montgomery Alabama news.

Michigan auto industry company plans Alabama plant

HANCEVILLE, Ala. (AP) - Michigan-based Royal Technologies Corp. has announced plans to open a plant in north Alabama that will service the automobile industry in the Southeast and create as many as 400 jobs.

Royal Technologies officials, announcing the plans Wednesday, said it would be the company's first plant outside of Michigan, where four plants employ about 800 workers.

The company, with an investment of about $30 million over several years, is purchasing 26.6 acres in the Cullman Industrial Park for the plant, which primarily will supply interior trim.

Governor Bob Riley, who joined in the announcement ceremony, said it showed the state can compete and win even in an economic downturn.

Company officials said the primary purpose of the project is to build a new manufacturing operation in the Southeast to service the automotive market.

(Copyright 2009 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

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