Tombigbee River continues to rise in west Alabama

Tombigbee River levels continue to rise

DEMOPOLIS, Ala. (WSFA) - The Tombigbee River in Demopolis continues to rise, and it’s on its way to being the sixth-highest level on record for the city. Now, there’s added to the concern: more rain is expected in the coming week.

“Of course, that’s my home,” said Gaye King, who is suffering from a double-dose of bad luck. First, her primary home in Meridian, Mississippi, burned and now this. Her camp house in Demopolis is surrounded by water from the Tombigbee River.

“I have to stay here and do what I have to do. We’re just praying the water doesn’t get inside," King explained.

What was the main culvert Wednesday in what’s known as the Brickyard community, is now facing water that is much higher, more threatening, and more concerning to Demopolis Fire Chief Keith Murray. The added dilemma? The forecast calls for more rain on Monday.

“With that water running really hard, it creates a hazard for us, and we have to work in different conditions,” said Murray assessed.

By Sunday, the welcome sign near the boat landing on the river will likely be underwater when the Tombigbee reaches a crest of more than 84 feet.

The welcome sign in Demopolis near the boat launch is mostly underway thanks to flooding on the Tombigbee River with more rain expected.
The welcome sign in Demopolis near the boat launch is mostly underway thanks to flooding on the Tombigbee River with more rain expected. (Source: WSFA 12 News)

Even though the Tombigbee River is expected to rise another three feet or so, there are no plans to order an evacuation.

“They’re not going to do that unless there is hardcore evidence that there’s a life threat,” said Chief Murray.

King, for one, has it all worked out. Talk about making the best of it. She used a trailer and a plank to get inside her home to stay safe and dry. No problem at all for this Hurricane Katrina survivor.

“So, I’m okay, you know?” King said. And she’s okay with the Tombigbee not in its natural path, okay for now with it being angry, fast-moving and swollen.

On the county side of things, Marengo County EMA officials say there are no major issues with the river flooding for now.

Down the road a bit in Selma, the Alabama River is predicted to crest no higher than 49 feet.

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