Alabama votes ‘no’ to state-appointed school board

Alabama votes ‘no’ to state-appointed school board
Alabama voters have decided, and the state will not do away with its elected school board. (Source: Long, Holley)

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (WSFA) - Alabama voters have decided, and the state will not do away with its elected school board.

The results show Alabama residents voted “no” to Amendment 1. The amendment would have replaced the elected state school board with an appointed commission tasked with coming up with an alternative to Common Core curriculum standards.

Supporters, including Gov. Kay Ivey, say the change would have ensured education experts make policy decisions, but critics have called it a power grab.

Gina Maiola, Press Secretary for Ivey, sent this statement about the amendment:

“Amendment One was a bold and ambitious effort to transform our state’s public schools. Governor Ivey was willing to step out and support this idea because she firmly believed leadership – and change – started with the Board itself. Tonight, however, it appears the fear of losing the right to elect our State School Board members was greater than the confidence we had that fundamental change could be made. While disappointed, the governor’s resolve to improve our public education system remains intact. Amendment One is not where her plans for education stop, and you’ll see her continue to be more innovative and creative with her approach to improving Alabama.”

If the amendment had passed, Ivey would have appointed all nine members of the Alabama Commission on Elementary and Secondary Education. The members would have been confirmed by the Alabama Senate and would have served six-year staggered terms.

A state education secretary would have replaced the state superintendent. The secretary would have been appointed by the commission and confirmed by the Senate.

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