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County Road 12: Thread My Needle hoping to inspire new generation of quilters

Updated: Jun. 11, 2021 at 2:29 PM CDT
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WETUMPKA, Ala. (WSFA) - It’s an art form that’s been passed down from one generation to the next. While interest in quilting may not be as strong as it was 50 years ago, one group in Wetumpka is moving full seams ahead.

“Thread My Needle started at my house,” said quilter Jacqueline Lacey with the group. “Our group is a spiritual group. We have so much fun. We had one lady play the piano, we’d sing, and say a prayer.”

The group, known as Thread My Needle, started stitching together back in 1997.

“At one time we had 20 members or more,” said Martha Piner with the organization. “This is a Thread My Needle quilt. The ladies pictures are on the quilt. These are members we’ve had and some of us are still around.”

The work they do here truly is art.

“We don’t do anything here with a machine,” said Lacey. “We do it by hand.”

Wetumpka group "Thread My Needle" hoping to inspire the next generation to get into quilting.
Wetumpka group "Thread My Needle" hoping to inspire the next generation to get into quilting.(WSFA 12 News)

There hands aren’t the only things that stay moving.

“On Tuesday I come down here, and I do quilt now,” said member Mazell H. Townsend. “I don’t come here and not quilt, but I sure do enjoy talking and listening to them tell stories. But I know more stories than they know.”

Over the years, the group has gotten smaller and smaller. Attracting younger members hasn’t been easy.

“We don’t want it to become a lost art,” said Piner. “We want to pass it down from generation to generation.”

They’re just waiting to share their passion with others.

“Oh, I just get excited knowing someone wants to do it,” said Lacey.

Wetumpka group "Thread My Needle" hoping to inspire the next generation to get into quilting.
Wetumpka group "Thread My Needle" hoping to inspire the next generation to get into quilting.(WSFA 12 News)

It’s an art form that gets passed down from one generation to the next. And, they’d like to keep that pipeline going.

“There’s a lot you can do with your hands. You can make a quilt top ,and then a quilt and do a neat job. We do a neat job,” said Townsend.

You can join the stitching, singing and conversation the second Tuesday in July from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Elmore County Black History Museum.

Copyright 2021 WSFA 12 News. All rights reserved.