Reward increased for information in historic Tallassee mill fire

Reward increased for information in historic Tallassee mill fire
Vehicle of interest (Source: Tallassee Police Department)
Vehicle of interest (Source: Tallassee Police Department)
Vehicle of interest (Source: Tallassee Police Department)
Vehicle of interest (Source: Tallassee Police Department)
The mill after the fire. (Source: WSFA 12 News)
The mill after the fire. (Source: WSFA 12 News)

TALLASSEE, AL (WSFA) - The reward for information in a Tallassee mill fire has increased to $25,000.

The fire happened on May 4, 2016. According to Central Alabama CrimeStoppers, Mount Vernon Pine LLC has increased their reward to $21,500 for any information that leads to an arrest in the fire that destroyed the historic Tallassee mill on Lower Tuskegee Road. Mount Vernon Pine LLC still owns the property.

CrimeStoppers will also pay $1,000 within 30 days of an arrest, and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives is also offering up to a $2,500 reward upon arrests and conviction of anyone involved.

CrimeStoppers Director Tony Garrett says there is no new information being released by authorities regarding the fire that destroyed the historical landmark. Still shots on the property at the time of the fire show a dark colored vehicle, an unknown make and model SUV, with a different colored hood. Investigators believe two men were in the vehicle the night of the fire.

Anyone with information regarding the vehicle or suspects should call the police or CrimeStoppers at 215-STOP.

The original mill was built in 1840 and made Confederate uniforms and other fabric. In the late 1890s, the East Mills were constructed at the site and an addition was made in the 1920s.

From 1900-2005, it was owned by Mount Vernon Mills, a Maryland-based company.

It operated continuously until 2005 when it was closed. The property was sold to a Birmingham company called Process Knowledge in 2006. They deconstructed cotton warehouses on one end of the property to harvest the longleaf pine wood. It was then purchased by Birmingham businessmen Thomas Hudson and his son, Thomas Hudson III, under the name of their company Mount Vernon Pine LLC, which was created for the specific purpose of marketing the salvaged wood.

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