Alabamians discuss whether state should have hands-free driving law

Alabamians discuss whether state should have hands-free driving law
After Georgia implemented its hands-free driving law on July 1, many Alabamians are asking themselves if Alabama should do the same.

MONTGOMERY, AL (WSFA) - Should Alabama have a hands-free driving law?

After Georgia implemented its hands-free driving law on July 1, many Alabamians are asking themselves if Alabama should do the same.

"I don't even believe in talking on the phone either. You got a phone in your car it's still a distraction so you should definitely not be holding anything in your hand or texting, no way. There's too many fatalities. Life is short," Willie Scott said.

Scott's friend died at the hands of a distracted driver.

"I was in shock for about two weeks. I was in shock," Scott said.

Scott believes his friend would still be alive if a hands-free driving law was in place before his accident.

"He would definitely be here. Like I said, Alabama should definitely do it because Montgomery has grown, there's a lot of drivers on the road, so I believe in it. I support it 100 percent," Scott said.

Georgia's hands-free driving law prohibits drivers from holding electronic devices while driving, even at stop signs and red lights.

Including Georgia, there are now 16 states with a hands-free driving law. While Alabama does have a texting and driving law, it still allows for drivers to hold their electronic devices while driving.

"I don't think anybody should drive with a telephone in their hand. I don't like texting, and I don't like talking on the phone while you're driving. It's absolutely too dangerous for everybody, the driver and the people they're coming toward," Lynelle Roy said.

Roy is in support of Alabama implementing a hands-free driving law, and so is Harry Wainwright.

"I take my phone out and I lay it on my console. If I have a phone call I hit a button. I do not pick it up, I do not do anything with the phone; therefore, both hands are on the wheel," Wainwright said.

However, not all Alabamians agree.

"If you're at a stop light, I think if you're using your GPS, you should be allowed to look down to check it. You have to do that because not every car has the screens on it now," Johnnie Sankey said.

Alabaster Senator, Cam Ward, wants Alabama to follow in Georgia's footsteps.

"It's a public safety hazard and every other day you pick up a paper or watch TV or look online and hear about another teenager who died because of distracted driving," Ward said.

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